Posts Tagged ‘Toys’

The Robo Toy Fest returned for its annual event this past Sunday. Taking place at the Pasadena Convention Center, this all-ages expo features dozens of artists and vendors all showcasing any media involving robots or mechs. From Transformers to Power Rangers and more, any fan of robot toys would love to see everything here. Visitors would find more than enough toys around to keep their interests piqued for hours. Admission only costs $10 and allows in-and-out privileges the entire day. Robo Toy Fest normally operates along with Brick Boutique, but for some reason that event did not return this year, so Robo Toy Fest operated on its own. For a small event though, one could see everything present within half an hour. However, the event organizers provided some extra content to entice visitors to stay, such as complimentary snacks and special guest celebrities doing autograph signings and photographs with visitors. I specifically saw one of the Red Rangers from one of the Power Rangers seasons, as well as the actor that portrayed Liu Kang in a Mortal Kombat movie. For those with expanded interests, plenty of vendors present provided merchandise from video games, comics, anime, manga, and more, giving fans more to see than just robots.

Robo Toy Fest returns at different times of the year. Last year, Robo Toy Fest took place in October, way off from this year in May. The organizers of Robo Toy Fest also put on a lot of other similar events at the Pasadena Convention Center, which I will list below. Make sure you like Robo Toy Fest on Facebook to see what else they have coming up. To better understand what transpires here, check out these other similar events held at the Pasadena Convention Center:

Many fandom events have occurred recently in Southern California. The term “fandom” refers to a broad range of pop culture interests and hobbies, from comics to video games to anime/manga and more. The most popular ones cost the most to get in, but a lot of smaller ones often do not cost much, if not completely free, to attend, and more often than not the smaller ones still attract a huge crowd, such as TitanCon 2017. Hosted at the student union on the Cal State Fullerton campus, TitanCon represents a locally-run community event around all things anime, manga, and video games. Taking place this past Saturday from 11am to 10pm, this free and all-ages event attracted thousands of fans of anime, manga, and video games to this quaint gathering for a fun day of mixing and mingling. Visitors would find artists, vendors, merchandise, mobile food vendors, live entertainment, cosplay contests, video games, a maid café, and more.

While it may not have the abundant amount of content that larger conventions and expos would have, Coast Con still had enough content to keep visitors occupied for hours. The student union primarily contained all the happenings of TitanCon, where attendees would check in, find the artist/vendor hall, check out all the programming, enter the maid café, play games, and more. On the other side of the student union from the check-in table, the majority of cosplayers gathered on all floors. The cosplayers took advantage of the stairs and the large outdoor space to handle all their photos, dancing, and acting.

Since none of the programming took place at the southeast section of the student union, this represented a great place to not only relax, but for attendees to mingle and meet others. I have attended countless fandom events in the past, but always attended as a regular person with a camera. This time, I actually arrived in costume, providing me with an entirely different experience. Many attendees stopped me to take a photo of me, while many others wanted to converse with me. Sure this distracted me from taking hundreds of photos like I usually do, but experiencing the life of a cosplayer more than made up for it, as I now understand how other cosplayers feel. While it may sound like a silly concept to people not into comics, anime, video games, or other forms of media, I highly encourage everyone to try cosplaying at least once, and not just buying a premade costume from a Halloween store.

Expect many more fandom events in Southern California in the near future. SoCal has Comic Con Revolution taking place in less than two weeks from now. The granddaddy of all anime events, the Anime Expo, takes place on the 4th of July weekend as it always does. The major maestro of comic cons, the Comic Con, takes place just three weeks following Anime Expo. Remember that smaller events will always occur between then, so always check with your local community to find more events to visit.

The Orange County Fair & Event Center’s Imaginology event returned for its 38th year running this past weekend in Costa Mesa. This free and all-ages event covered all things S.T.E.A.M. related – science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics. If it had anything to do with creativity, one would surely find it at Imaginology. Due to the nature of this event, its target audience primarily revolved around children from elementary school through high school. Suffice to say, anyone of any age would still surely appreciate all the gadgets, exhibits, demos, gizmos, toys, and whatnot available to interact with here.

As an event with lots of variety in the description, the plethora of available things to do would keep anyone occupied for hours. The center area in front of the hangar included a music stage, food vendors, and a handful of additional demo booths for visitors to check out. Around here, all the buildings contained something different. One building contained a good mixture of tables to interact with that included math, smartphones, costume design, traditional canvas art, 3D printing, automotive exhibits, fashion, medical devices, and more. Another building contained nature and biology exhibits, with the back exit door leading to outdoor nature exhibits. Between these two buildings, visitors would find the robotics hall, complete with teams and robotics competitions. Across the way, these buildings contained literature, photography, model kits, and traditional arts & crafts. The hall in between marked the main entrance to Imaginology – I had entered through the back, so I experienced this event in an odd order. In the entrance hallway, visitors got a glimpse at what they would encounter in the rest of the event, such as aerial arts, model trains, robotics, virtual reality, animals, engineering toys, and more. Lastly, the hangar contained what I refer to as glorified tabletop games, such as Jenga, Battleship, corn hole, jigsaw puzzles, and more. Once I stumbled upon this area, I quickly realized that all of these would fit in nicely at a beer festival.

Imaginology presents so much to do or see that it would clearly take more than a day to check out every single exhibit. Luckily, Imaginology takes place over the course of a three-day weekend, and it costs nothing to enter other than transportation and parking. Take note of other similar S.T.E.A.M. events in your area, as most of these do not cost anything to enter because they want to spread knowledge and education to today’s youth. Keep an eye out for Imaginology’s return next year as well, which normally takes place in mid-April.

Legos – we all grew up with it, and while it has largely remained a toy for children, it has captivated our hearts so much that we can still enjoy it as adults. Thankfully, the world has Lego expos and conventions for those still young at heart, such as at Bricks LA 2017, a Lego exhibit. Taking place at the Pasadena Conference Center this past weekend, this exhibit for all things Legos contained multiple aisles of carefully curated works of art constructed with Lego pieces. Visitors paid an admission of $10 and gained access to the floor full of Lego sculptures, landscapes, artwork, Lego machines, and more. While visitors could interact with the master builders behind some of these works, most of the tables simply had the Lego artworks with no one else around to inquire about the work. The center of the floor primarily contained Lego art on display, while the outer areas had more. The back wall had all of the vendors, most of which sold Lego sets and other paraphernalia. The front area had some of the interactive demos, such as a medieval-themed board game.

Compared to last year’s Bricks LA, not too much has changed as far as content goes. On one hand, the price of admission doubled from last year’s $5 admission, and at the same time the event did not get any bigger. On the other hand, this year’s Bricks LA felt a lot more interactive. While last year’s event only had exhibits and vendors, this year featured a “sandbox” area for anyone to construct whatever they felt like. A few of the exhibits allowed attendees to interact with the constructs, such as the Ultimate Nexo Brick Battle near the front of the event. This game resembled a medieval board game of four teams trying to take out the competition to remain the last team standing on the field.

If you love Legos and/or art in general, you owe it to yourself to check out Bricks LA when it next returns. When will it return? To find out, give Bricks LA a like on Facebook and a follow on Twitter. I attended Bricks LA on Saturday afternoon, prime time for most people to attend. Still, it did not have as many crazy kids running amok as I had expected. Sure you could see everything in less than an hour, but at that low admission price, Bricks LA makes for a fun activity that anyone can enjoy.

Legos – we all grew up with it, and while it has largely remained a toy for children, it has captivated our hearts so much that we can still enjoy it as adults. Thankfully, the world has Lego expos and conventions for those still young at heart, such as at Bricks LA 2017, a Lego exhibit. Taking place at the Pasadena Conference Center this Saturday and Sunday from 10am to 5pm on both days, this exhibit for all things Legos contains multiple aisles of carefully curated works of art constructed with Lego pieces. Visitors pay a simple admission of $10 to gain access to a floor full of Lego sculptures, landscapes, artwork, Lego machines, and more. While visitors may interact with the master builders behind some of these works, most of the tables generally have the Lego artworks with no one else around to inquire about the work. The center of the floor primarily contains Lego art on display, while the outer areas have other things. Bricks LA generally places all of the vendors, most of which sell Lego sets and other paraphernalia, on one side of the floor. The front area usually has some of the interactive demos, such as train tracks and a conveyor system that resembles a Rube Goldberg machine.

If you love Legos and/or art in general, you owe it to yourself to check out Bricks LA some time this weekend. Give Bricks LA a like on Facebook and a follow on Twitter. For an event centered on toys, Bricks LA does not always have a bunch of crazy children running amok, as visitors consist mostly of young adults rather than children. Sure you could see everything in less than an hour, but at that low admission price, Bricks LA makes for a fun activity that anyone can enjoy, and it also makes for an awesome photo collection.

Legos – we all grew up with it, and while it has largely remained a toy for children, it has captivated our hearts so much that we can still enjoy it as adults. Thankfully, the world has Lego expos and conventions for those still young at heart, such as at Bricks LA 2016, a Lego exhibit. Taking place at the Pasadena Conference Center this past weekend, this exhibit for all things Legos contained multiple aisles of carefully curated works of art constructed with Lego pieces. Visitors paid a simple admission of $5 and gained access to the floor full of Lego sculptures, landscapes, artwork, Lego machines, and more. While visitors could interact with the master builders behind some of these works, most of the tables simply had the Lego artworks with no one else around to inquire about the work. The center of the floor primarily contained Lego art on display, while the outer areas had more. The back wall had all of the vendors, most of which sold Lego sets and other paraphernalia. The front area had some of the interactive demos, such as train tracks and the conveyor system that resembled a Rube Goldberg machine.

If you love Legos and/or art in general, you owe it to yourself to check out Bricks LA when it next returns. When will it return? To find out, give Bricks LA a like on Facebook and a follow on Twitter. I attended Bricks LA on Saturday afternoon, prime time for most people to attend. Still, it did not have as many crazy kids running amok as I had expected. Sure you could see everything in less than an hour, but at that low admission price, Bricks LA makes for a fun activity that anyone can enjoy.