Posts Tagged ‘Cartoons’

The 2017 Anime Expo returns to the Los Angeles Convention Center starting this Saturday and running through Tuesday. This annual 4-day expo for all things Anime & Manga attracts exhibitors and fans from across the globe for the largest gathering of its kind in the world. What started as a simple expo for those in the Anime industry has grown to encompass anything remotely related to the art of Japanese art & animation. Today, this large expo now hosts artists, designers, vendors, video game companies, technicians, actors/actresses, voice actors, models, musicians, singers, cosplayers, and much more to spread their work out to the public as well as interact with the fans. With so much to do, so many people to see, and so many people wanting to get in (tens of thousands of visitors on the first day!), naturally the organizers had to make this expo cover a span of four days every year.

As the current world’s largest expo of its kind, one can expect sheer overflow of people in the area for miles. Road traffic does not face as much of a problem, save for the exuberant parking prices that reaches upwards of $40 per vehicle. Pedestrian traffic causes the most headaches, from the uncontrolled crosswalks to the endless line of jaywalkers. If anything definitely terrorizes attendees, the line to enter the expo causes the most grief. From getting in line to getting into the building, the wait in the mornings usually takes hours to enter. Strangely, very few attendees complain about this, as if they accept this year after year. Upon questioning some attendees from previous years, they mention that at least a hundred attendees camp overnight, and that entering the line at 8am when the expo opens still takes over an hour to get in. They also mention that the first day always sees the most amount of attendees, which sounds reasonable. Lesson learned: if attending Anime Expo, either attend extremely early on the first day, or attend on the second and/or third day.

The actual expo covers the entire span on the convention center, both the South Hall and the West Hall. The main expo occurs in the South Hall, while the West Hall houses the miscellaneous activities, such as workshops, video game competitions, cosplay contests, and more. The expo simply has too much going on, so I understand why most attendees purchase either the two or four day pass rather than just a single day. The expo contains different sections based on the content; for example, attendees would find the artist booths at the back, the autographs at the right, the merchandise in the middle, and celebrity/actor appearances at the front.

For any type of expo or convention of this nature, sure we may want to pay attention to the exhibitors, but at the heart of any gathering of this kind, our attention instantly turns to the cosplayers. Attendees love to dress up as their favorite character to show their pride and/or craftsmanship, while some simply slap together a lazy costume just to blend in somehow, such as the hundreds of attendees with a Teemo hat. For Anime Expo, the world’s largest expo of its kind, attendees either go all in or go nothing.

The 2015 Anime Expo wrapped up this year’s installment at the Los Angeles Convention Center this past Sunday. This annual 4-day expo for all things Anime & Manga attracts exhibitors and fans from across the globe for the largest gathering of its kind in the world. What started as a simple expo for those in the Anime industry has grown to encompass anything remotely related to the art of Japanese art & animation. Today, this large expo now hosts artists, designers, vendors, video game companies, technicians, actors/actresses, voice actors, models, musicians, singers, cosplayers, and much more to spread their work out to the public as well as interact with the fans. With so much to do, so many people to see, and so many people wanting to get in (tens of thousands of visitors on the first day!), naturally the organizers had to make this expo cover a span of four days every year.

The actual expo covered the entire span on the convention center, both the South Hall and the West Hall. The main expo occurred in the South Hall, while the West Hall housed the miscellaneous activities, such as workshops, video game competitions, cosplay contests, and more. The expo simply had too much going on, so I understand why most attendees purchased either the two or four day pass rather than just a single day. The expo contained different sections based on the content; for example, attendees could find the artist booths at the back, the autographs at the right, the merchandise in the middle, and celebrity/actor appearances at the front.

For any type of expo or convention of this nature, sure we may want to pay attention to the exhibitors, but at the heart of any gathering of this kind, our attention instantly turns to the cosplayers. Attendees love to dress up as their favorite character to show their pride and/or craftsmanship, while some simply slap together a lazy costume just to blend in somehow, such as the hundreds of attendees with a Teemo hat. For Anime Expo, the world’s largest expo of its kind, attendees either go all in or go nothing. Observe some of the fun costumes from Day 2 of the 2015 Anime Expo:

Missed out on Anime Expo this year? Fear not – Anime California comes to Orange County on the weekend of August 28-30. At $45 for the entire weekend, expect to see nearly the same things at Anime Expo. If you desire the massive crowds and content that Anime Expo offers, the 2016 Anime Expo takes place July 1-4 next year back at the Los Angeles Convention Center. On the bright side, this gives you plenty of time to work on that amazing costume that will wow everyone!

The 2015 Anime Expo returns to the Los Angeles Convention Center starting this Thursday and running through Sunday. This annual 4-day expo for all things Anime & Manga attracts exhibitors and fans from across the globe for the largest gathering of its kind in the world. What started as a simple expo for those in the Anime industry has grown to encompass anything remotely related to the art of Japanese art & animation. Today, this large expo now hosts artists, designers, vendors, video game companies, technicians, actors/actresses, voice actors, models, musicians, singers, cosplayers, and much more to spread their work out to the public as well as interact with the fans. With so much to do, so many people to see, and so many people wanting to get in (tens of thousands of visitors on the first day!), naturally the organizers had to make this expo cover a span of four days every year.

As the current world’s largest expo of its kind, one can expect sheer overflow of people in the area for miles. Road traffic does not face as much of a problem, save for the exuberant parking prices that reaches upwards of $40 per vehicle. Pedestrian traffic causes the most headaches, from the uncontrolled crosswalks to the endless line of jaywalkers. If anything definitely terrorizes attendees, the line to enter the expo causes the most grief. From getting in line to getting into the building, the wait on the morning of the 4th of July usually takes hours to enter. Strangely, very few attendees complain about this, as if they accept this year after year. For a first-time attendee like myself, I speak for many other first-time attendees when I say that this expo NEEDS an attendance limit. Comic Con follows an attendance limit, yet still sells out in under a minute every year. Upon questioning some attendees from previous years, they mention that at least a hundred attendees camp overnight, and that entering the line at 8am when the expo opens still takes over an hour to get in. They also mention that the first day always sees the most amount of attendees, which sounds reasonable. Lesson learned: if attending Anime Expo, either attend extremely early on the first day, or attend on the second and/or third day.

The actual expo covers the entire span on the convention center, both the South Hall and the West Hall. The main expo occurs in the South Hall, while the West Hall houses the miscellaneous activities, such as workshops, video game competitions, cosplay contests, and more. The expo simply has too much going on, so I understand why most attendees purchase either the two or four day pass rather than just a single day. The expo contains different sections based on the content; for example, attendees would find the artist booths at the back, the autographs at the right, the merchandise in the middle, and celebrity/actor appearances at the front.

For any type of expo or convention of this nature, sure we may want to pay attention to the exhibitors, but at the heart of any gathering of this kind, our attention instantly turns to the cosplayers. Attendees love to dress up as their favorite character to show their pride and/or craftsmanship, while some simply slap together a lazy costume just to blend in somehow, such as the hundreds of attendees with a Teemo hat. For Anime Expo, the world’s largest expo of its kind, attendees either go all in or go nothing. Observe some of the fun costumes from the 2013 Anime Expo:

As an added bonus, my cousin also took a handful of photos, and you may now observe Anime Expo from his point of view too:

If you feel that you cannot attend Anime Expo this year, fear not – Anime California comes to Orange County on the weekend of August 28-30. At $45 for the entire weekend, expect to see nearly the same things at Anime Expo. If you desire the massive crowds and content that Anime Expo offers, keep this weekend open for the 2014 Anime Expo at the Los Angeles Convention Center. If you have a costume, wear it proudly and show it off to everyone!

The 2014 Anime Expo returns to the Los Angeles Convention Center starting this Thursday and running through Sunday. This annual 4-day expo for all things Anime & Manga attracts exhibitors and fans from across the globe for the largest gathering of its kind in the world. What started as a simple expo for those in the Anime industry has grown to encompass anything remotely related to the art of Japanese art & animation. Today, this large expo now hosts artists, designers, vendors, video game companies, technicians, actors/actresses, voice actors, models, musicians, singers, cosplayers, and much more to spread their work out to the public as well as interact with the fans. With so much to do, so many people to see, and so many people wanting to get in (tens of thousands of visitors on the first day!), naturally the organizers had to make this expo cover a span of four days every year.

As the current world’s largest expo of its kind, one can expect sheer overflow of people in the area for miles. Road traffic does not face as much of a problem, save for the exuberant parking prices that reaches upwards of $40 per vehicle. Pedestrian traffic causes the most headaches, from the uncontrolled crosswalks to the endless line of jaywalkers. If anything definitely terrorizes attendees, the line to enter the expo causes the most grief. From getting in line to getting into the building, the wait on the morning of the 4th of July usually takes hours to enter. Strangely, very few attendees complain about this, as if they accept this year after year. For a first-time attendee like myself, I speak for many other first-time attendees when I say that this expo NEEDS an attendance limit. Comic Con follows an attendance limit, yet still sells out in under a minute every year. Upon questioning some attendees from previous years, they mention that at least a hundred attendees camp overnight, and that entering the line at 8am when the expo opens still takes over an hour to get in. They also mention that the first day always sees the most amount of attendees, which sounds reasonable. Lesson learned: if attending Anime Expo, either attend extremely early on the first day, or attend on the second and/or third day.

The actual expo covers the entire span on the convention center, both the South Hall and the West Hall. The main expo occurs in the South Hall, while the West Hall houses the miscellaneous activities, such as workshops, video game competitions, cosplay contests, and more. The expo simply has too much going on, so I understand why most attendees purchase either the two or four day pass rather than just a single day. The expo contains different sections based on the content; for example, attendees would find the artist booths at the back, the autographs at the right, the merchandise in the middle, and celebrity/actor appearances at the front.

For any type of expo or convention of this nature, sure we may want to pay attention to the exhibitors, but at the heart of any gathering of this kind, our attention instantly turns to the cosplayers. Attendees love to dress up as their favorite character to show their pride and/or craftsmanship, while some simply slap together a lazy costume just to blend in somehow, such as the hundreds of attendees with a Teemo hat. For Anime Expo, the world’s largest expo of its kind, attendees either go all in or go nothing. Observe some of the fun costumes from Day 1 of the 2013 Anime Expo:

As an added bonus, my cousin also took a handful of photos, and you may now observe Anime Expo from his point of view too:

If you feel that you cannot attend Anime Expo this year, fear not – Anime California comes to Orange County on the weekend of August 22-24. At $40 per day, expect to see nearly the same things at Anime Expo. If you desire the massive crowds and content that Anime Expo offers, keep this weekend open for the 2014 Anime Expo at the Los Angeles Convention Center. If you have a costume, wear it proudly and show it off to everyone!

The 2013 Anime Expo wrapped up this year’s installment at the Los Angeles Convention Center this past Sunday. This annual 4-day expo for all things Anime & Manga attracts exhibitors and fans from across the globe for the largest gathering of its kind in the world. What started as a simple expo for those in the Anime industry has grown to encompass anything remotely related to the art of Japanese art & animation. Today, this large expo now hosts artists, designers, vendors, video game companies, technicians, actors/actresses, voice actors, models, musicians, singers, cosplayers, and much more to spread their work out to the public as well as interact with the fans. With so much to do, so many people to see, and so many people wanting to get in (tens of thousands of visitors on the first day!), naturally the organizers had to make this expo cover a span of four days every year.

As the current world’s largest expo of its kind, one can expect sheer overflow of people in the area for miles. Road traffic did not face as much of a problem, save for the exuberant parking prices that reached upwards of $40 per vehicle. Pedestrian traffic caused the most headaches, from the uncontrolled crosswalks to the endless line of jaywalkers. If anything definitely terrorized attendees, the line to enter the expo caused the most grief. From getting in line to getting into the building, the wait on Thursday morning took over three hours… in the hot summer sun. Strangely, very few attendees seemed to complain about this, as if they accept this year after year. For a first-time attendee like myself, I speak for many other first-time attendees when I say that this expo NEEDS an attendance limit. Comic Con follows an attendance limit, yet still sells out in under a minute every year. Upon questioning some returning attendees, they mentioned that at least a hundred attendees camped overnight, and that entering the line at 8am when the expo opened still took over an hour to get in. They also mentioned that the first day always sees the most amount of attendees, which sounds reasonable. Lesson learned: if attending Anime Expo, either attend extremely early on the first day, or attend on the second and/or third day.

The actual expo covered the entire span on the convention center, both the South Hall and the West Hall. The main expo occurred in the South Hall, while the West Hall housed the miscellaneous activities, such as workshops, video game competitions, cosplay contests, and more. The expo simply had too much going on, so I understand why most attendees purchased either the two or four day pass rather than just a single day. The expo contained different sections based on the content; for example, attendees could find the artist booths at the back, the autographs at the right, the merchandise in the middle, and celebrity/actor appearances at the front.

For any type of expo or convention of this nature, sure we may want to pay attention to the exhibitors, but at the heart of any gathering of this kind, our attention instantly turns to the cosplayers. Attendees love to dress up as their favorite character to show their pride and/or craftsmanship, while some simply slap together a lazy costume just to blend in somehow, such as the hundreds of attendees with a Teemo hat. For Anime Expo, the world’s largest expo of its kind, attendees either go all in or go nothing. Observe some of the fun costumes from Day 1 of the 2013 Anime Expo:

As an added bonus, my cousin also took a handful of photos, and you may now observe Anime Expo from his point of view too:

Missed out on Anime Expo this year? Fear not – the 2013 AM² Con returns to Orange County on the weekend of August 23-25, two months later than last year. Unlike last year, AM² Con now requires a minimal admission fee that starts at $5 compared to Anime Expo’s $40 per day – expect to see nearly the same things, but on a smaller scale. If you desire the massive crowds and content that Anime Expo offers, the 2014 Anime Expo takes place July 3-6 next year back at the Los Angeles Convention Center. On the bright side, this gives you plenty of time to work on that amazing costume that will wow everyone!

The 2012 Long Beach Comic & Horror Con wrapped up this past weekend at the Long Beach Convention Center. This two-day expo of comics, video games, anime, manga, and toys brought together fans, artists, designers, and more. With plenty of speakers and workshops, the expo ensured that any attendee would find something to stay occupied. Occasionally, some dynamic event would break out for all attendees to spectate.

Perhaps the most rad vehicle parked outside:

The main floor consisted of merchandise on the sides and artists in the center. None of the merchandise stood out to me, but many other attendees found something interesting there.

As mentioned before, dynamic events occurred occasionally throughout the expo, engaging guests and providing instant entertainment.

And finally, for the many people out there asking about my costume, I took last year’s costume and gave it a modern spin:

Did you attend this year? If you took a picture of me, I would love to see it, so please send the image or link over my way. Remember that the Long Beach Comic Con occurs twice a year, so if you cannot attend the San Diego Comic Con, Long Beach also has a great turnout.

The 2012 Long Beach Comic & Horror Con returns this weekend to the Long Beach Convention Center. This semi-annual expo of comics, video games, anime, manga, and more features everything fans love about the respective genre, and this weekend’s expo ties in with Halloween to create a Comic & Horror Con. In addition to the typical cosplayers, expect to see more gore throughout the expo. Attendees get to experience interacting with other fans, merchandise, art exhibits, artist autographs, and so much more. Tickets cost $25 to attend Saturday, and $20 to attend Sunday. The convention center’s parking usually costs $10 for all-day parking – I suggest scanning the area for cheaper parking, taking public transportation, or parking in the neighborhoods east of Alamitos Ave and walking to the expo.

Planning to attend in costume? Take part in a Comic Con group photo on Saturday morning, complimentary with paid admission! Costumed attendees should meet at the top of the main stairs to the convention center at 8:30am to check in and register, and the photographing takes place between 8:45am and 9:15am. Participants will even obtain recognition during the expo’s opening ceremony! I will definitely try to make it to this group photo, so I hope to see you there.