Posts Tagged ‘Brewery’

The Orange County Brew Ha Ha returns for its eighth iteration this Saturday at Oak Canyon Park in Silverado. Benefiting the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, this craft beer festival will feature over 90 different breweries, over 200 different beers, many food trucks, seminars from beer experts, live entertainment, and more. General admission costs $45 and begins at 1pm, while VIP admission costs $60 and begins at 12pm. All beers will cease pouring at 4pm, leaving the final hour to sober up and find food.

  • REMEMBER to bring PHOTO ID! Amazingly, many guests think they can enter without showing it to the front security.
  • Look up directions before arriving – cell phones receive no signal as you approach the park.
  • Basic toll-free directions: Get to the 55 freeway, exit Chapman Avenue, then drive east until you reach the lake, where a sign should point out when to turn left into the park.
  • Bring cash for parking in case they charge for parking. Because of the park’s location, I do not recommend riding a bike or walking, although you may get dropped off.
  • Food come at a separate cost, so anyone wanting to eat should arrive with extra cash. Click here for a list of attending restaurants and food trucks.
  • If you see that it has no signal, just turn off your cell phone during the fest. Smartphones can enter Airplane Mode instead.
  • Though the park contains many trees, consider applying sunscreen, and have extra sunscreen available. Security will not confiscate sunscreen from you.
  • For prolonged drinking, start with lighter beers and work your way to stronger beers. Click here for a list of attending breweries.
  • Try to hold on to your beer glass – guests receive no replacement for lost or broken glasses.
  • All beers stop pouring at 4pm. An extra grace hour will allow guests time to sober up and find food before leaving.
  • Oak Canyon Park only has two exits: one back towards Orange, the other through the mountains leading of Rancho Santa Margarita. Police WILL patrol both roads leaving the park!

Check out these pictures from last year’s OC Brew Ha Ha:

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Many famous people have started to branch out into products to sell under their namesake. While many people will instantly think of clothing or jewelry lines, this also applies to consumable goods, especially foods and drinks. Actors and musicians alike have come up with foods and/or drinks that represent them. Last year, I covered a line of hot sauces called Gringo Bandito released by Dexter Holland, the vocalist for the band The Offspring. Other such products include Stone Cold Steve Austin’s beer from El Segundo Brewing and Hanson’s beer called Mmmhops. Now, we can add another entry into the list of famous people or groups of people that have released something other than their known line of work – in this case, the band Pennywise has released a beer called Pennywiser.

Making its public debut in just over a week from now, Pennywiser has arrived to deliver a taste of what Pennywise represents. Strangely, a Southern Californian band partnered with a Northern California brewery, Lost Coast Brewery, to bring this beer back to Southern California. Pennywiser acts as a great stepping stone to get the band’s fans that do not normally drink beer into the IPA world. As a session IPA, Pennywiser sits at an easy 4.8% ABV, and contains some of the more common hops used in brewing: cascade, crystal, chinook, and citra hops. The hops do not attack the palate, but give the beer enough bitterness to allow the drinker to fully enjoy the citrus flavor and aroma present in the beer. Beer drinkers will appreciate the combination of hops, and music fans will appreciate a beer that they can enjoy without having to worry about its strength and boldness.

Pennywiser will see limited release in the South Bay starting the week of Labor Day 2017. This will primarily test the market to measure its popularity, as well as allow the brewery to fine-tune the recipe if necessary. Following the initial release, Pennywiser will see greater distribution as the brewery starts to bottle and ship it out. To stay updated on when and where you can taste some Pennywiser, make sure you follow Pennywise on Facebook and Twitter to see their posts and updates.

It goes without saying that every person in the world likes different things. No two people like the exact same things – variation adds some spice to life, and helps to spread culture and interests. However, with that comes some separation in what people like. Fans of a particular thing may never come into contact with fans of another thing. Specifically, traditional fans of punk rock music never cared for anything hip or trendy. The stereotype of punk rock fans ironically contains a lot of corporate names, as the typical punk rock fan would drink Pabst Blue Ribbon and eat at McDonald’s. One would rarely see a punk rock person at a hip or trendy place, especially microbreweries. I started my blog years ago as a way to bridge the gap and introduce the two worlds to each other, and it looks like progress exists in closing the gap at Thr3e Punk Ales Brewing.

A brewery exists for nearly every genre of music, and now we have one for punk rock with Thr3e Punk Ales Brewing. Located in the heart of Downtown Chula Vista, this brewery not only brings Chula Vista into the radar of San Diego breweries, but functions as one of the few, if not the only, punk rock themed breweries in the nation. Punk rock fans will love the beers that reference punk rock songs and/or artists, and the fans will also love the left wall that has lots of band logos printed there. Thr3e Punk Ales Brewing only opened their doors to the public a few months ago, but appears to have already gained a large following. I visited the tasting room on a Saturday afternoon and discovered a near-full tasting room. At the moment, they do not carry too large of a variety of different brews. However, Thr3e Punk Ales Brewing possesses multiple fermenters and brite tanks, meaning they will have more beers available soon.

If you find yourself in Chula Vista, or at least somewhere near Downtown San Diego, you ought to visit Thr3e Punk Ales Brewing and check out their progress and growth. See what else they have brewing up by liking them on Facebook and following them on Twitter.

For as much as Los Angeles pushes their local culture and mom & pop shops, the majority of the locals still believe in mass media and prefer big brands. When it comes to beer selection, much of Los Angeles still prefer their Corona, Heineken, and Budweiser. Local microbreweries may do what they can, but businesses appear based on the preferences of the local community, which partially explains the lack of microbreweries in Los Angeles. Trends have changed recently, leading to the establishment of a handful of breweries in Downtown LA’s Arts District. Once you expand beyond Downtown, you go back to the trend of preferring macro beers, especially if you venture eastward. In order to reach out to new grounds, one much take one step at a time, which Dry River Brewing has done.

Adding something a little bit different to the Downtown Los Angeles’ craft beer scene, Dry River Brewing officially opened their doors to the public at the beginning of July with their own approach to brewing. Located just off the 101 freeway in Boyle Heights just past the Arts District, over at Dry River Brewing, they believe in slow beer, something that traditionalists frown upon. The folks at Dry River Brewing like to experiment with allowing beer to sit and allow nature to take its course. As such, visitors can expect to find primarily wild ales and sour ales on tap at Dry River Brewing. Due to the nature of how they produce their brews, Dry River Brewing’s selection may cost more than the typical brewery, so keep that in mind if you intend to visit the tasting room. Speaking of the tasting room, Dry River Brewing only opens their doors on the first and third Saturdays of each month, so do not think you can just waltz over there any random day!

For more information and future updates, check out Dry River Brewing on Facebook and Twitter.

Covina’s Alosta Brewing brings back their Pintwood Derby for its fourth year running this Saturday after. Now moving to the Glendora Public Library, this charity fundraiser will see numerous people enter their crafted (toy) cars to race for trophies. Participants will pay the entry fee to create a small car that would run down a track, purely powered by gravity and friction. Alosta Brewing sells a starter kit for $5 for those not familiar with designing the small car. Children will compete in their own division, while adults will compete in an adults division. This year’s event will operate slightly different than previous years, as Alosta Brewing will turn this event into a mini beer festival as well. It costs $30 to attend the beer festival, which will take place outside the building that the racing will take place in. Attendees will receive unlimited beer samples from 12pm to 4pm while supplies last. These attendees that want to enter the Pintwood Derby will simply have to pay $5 more. Alosta Brewing has not yet specified if it will cost anything for minors to enter the derby, though they did mention that they will have gourmet food trucks on the premises.

The popularity of craft beer continues to remain ever strong. The current times feel like the peak of the trend, with third parties attempting to capitalize on the popularity. Take the gourmet food truck trend for example. In the first year or two, we saw lots of great food trucks with actual good food. Afterwards, event organizers started to try to take advantage of this by charging exorbitant amounts to get into to food truck festivals. As the trend started to fade away, we saw a lot of gimmicky food trucks with less than stellar food. All of that appears to happen right now to microbreweries, as lots of bad beer festivals exist to take advantage of the fact that people will pay lots of money for a few hours of drinking. Throughout all of this, local entrepreneurs still desire to enter the microbrewery business to deliver a quality experience, as opposed to the ones just looking to turn a quick profit. It takes some careful searching to discover hidden gems, such as a fresh young microbrewery in Los Angeles County, Angry Horse Brewing.

Located in Downtown Montebello, Angry Horse Brewing opened just a few months ago sometime in March. They have not even had an official grand opening yet. Regardless, Angry Horse Brewing has managed to gain quite a solid following in such a little time. Like most of Southern California’s breweries, Angry Horse Brewing does not specialize in a particular style of beer – they brew it all. I did not spot any fermenters in the back – only a handful of brite tanks. This allows them to carry a lot of different beers, from IPA’s to Belgian beers to stouts and more. All of the beers that I tried have an approachable feel to them – not too strong in any particular note, and with familiar flavors that anyone can enjoy.

Despite still operating in a “soft opening” phase, Angry Horse Brewing already has a lot of fans, evident by having a full house late on a Saturday afternoon. Support this local microbrewery and stay updated with what goes on here by liking them on Facebook and following them on Twitter.

Orange County mainstay brewery Cismontane Brewing recently turned seven years old, a feat in this competitive microbrewery market. As they do every year, Cismontane holds a party to celebrate their anniversary. However, this year brought about many new changes for Cismontane. Notably, Cismontane has relocated to a new facility in Santa Ana, departing from their original location in Rancho Santa Margarita. This marks Cismontane’s first time holding an anniversary event ever at this new Santa Ana location. To also mix things up, Cismontane changed the way they structured their anniversary event. In previous years, Cismontane held their anniversary like a beer festival. Guests would pay for a ticket to receive a set amount of beer pours as well as an anniversary glass. This year, Cismontane did away with the ticketing fees. Instead, they tapped a handful of barrel-aged beers for guests to enjoy. With no tickets or cover charges to worry about, guests could enter freely and simply pay for beers as they went. With this setup, guests would only pay for beers that they wanted to drink instead of paying for a set amount of beers that they may not get to enjoy. Unfortunately, Cismontane did not have an anniversary glass this time – they just had their regular merchandise for sale. Historically, Cismontane held their anniversary at the end of April or the beginning of May. Due to the sheer amount of beer events during that time this year, Cismontane kept postponing their anniversary to a more suitable date with the fewest amount of conflicting beer events.

Check out Cismontane Brewing at their new location in Santa Ana just off the 55 freeway. See what they have brewing up here by liking them on Facebook and following them on Twitter. Their new location can accommodate more guests than their previous Rancho Santa Margarita location (which Laguna Beach Beer Company has acquired after Cismontane moved), so check them out behind Pep Boys (enter on the west side).

Craft beer has certainly evolved a lot over the past few years. It appears that simply five years ago, many of today’s top microbreweries had either just started to emerge, or began their planning phases to open their doors to the public. Who would have expected to now see as many breweries around as we had originally thought years ago? Like the gourmet food truck fad that rose to fame in 2010, many entrepreneurs wanted to get in on the craft beer fad, which led to the saturation of breweries that large metropolitan areas now face. Many of the less popular breweries have since closed up shop, and some of the very popular breweries got bought out by corporate big beer. These days, one must do much more than simply open up a microbrewery, as they would face stiff competition. How does one accomplish that? Well it appears that Dutch’s Brewhouse has already done just that.

Nestled in the quaint Bixby Knolls neighborhood of Long Beach, Dutch’s Brewhouse brings a local craft beer presence to North Long Beach. As part of the 2017 influx of craft beer into Long Beach, Dutch’s Brewhouse hopes to deliver a different kind of craft beer experience to their area, especially since Bixby Knolls’ last major gastropub closed at the end of 2015. At the moment, Dutch’s Brewhouse actually does not have any house beers – if you walk in to Dutch’s Brewhouse today, you walk into a place that serves pizza and other breweries’ beers. In the near future, this will change once they get everything set up – not only will they start to serve their own house beers, but they will have a guest pilot system that allows customers to come in and brew their own beer. At the front of their shop lies a small pilot system, and once Dutch’s Brewhouse gets everything put into place, customers can book appointments and come in to brew. Very few places offer this service, so this marks a triumphant entry into the local craft beer market, especially for Long Beach since they have lacked local breweries for quite some time.

If you have interest in brewing your own beer but do not want to acquire all the equipment necessary to do so, check out Dutch’s Brewhouse in Long Beach when they can finally start going. Make sure you follow up with Dutch’s Brewhouse on Facebook and Twitter for updates on when they will start allowing brewing.

The craft beer scene in the South Bay area of Los Angeles County has surged quite a bit in the past year or two, and the scene will continue to experience rapid growth for an indefinite amount of time. This trend saw another spike this past Saturday when Absolution Brewing Company celebrated their third anniversary. Located across the ExxonMobil Refinery from the Torrance microbrewery core (which consists of Smog City Brewing and Monkish Brewing), Absolution Brewing represents another fine member of the South Bay craft beer collective. While they may not yet appear as widespread as Smog City or Monkish, the brews of Absolution live up to the expectations of any brewery from the South Bay.

At their third anniversary celebration, guests could still enter the tasting room and order beers right off the menu. To add to the celebration, Absolution employed a handful of additions, which included cask ales, games, mobile food vendors, and live music. Guests could still purchase beers as normal at the counter, but to those looking for a festival experience, Absolution offered just that in the form of beer packages. A general package cost $25 and came with three full beer pours, a souvenir glass, and one meal ticket from the food vendors. The VIP experience took place from 11am to 1pm, which consisted of unlimited beer pours for those two hours, plus everything that the $25 package gets.

Expect lots of hype and excitement from the South Bay in the upcoming weeks. This upcoming Saturday, Phantom Carriage in Carson will celebrate their second anniversary. The following weekend, Redondo Beach’s King Harbor Brewing Company will celebrate their third anniversary as well. The Monkish anniversary already happened the previous week, but one can expect that Smog City should have an anniversary event before summer starts. Regardless, one cannot go wrong with breweries in the South Bay, so head on over and check out some breweries!

The vernal equinox arrives this weekend, meaning that the weather will start to warm up, and the daily daylight will start to extend, providing even greater incentive to get out there and explore the world. Events around town occur regularly, and most people understand the basics of most of these events, such as 5k runs, art shows, or beer fests. But what happens when a traditional event comes up with a spin? Enter FirkFest, a beer festival celebrating the wonders of cask ales. Traditional beer fests see breweries or home brewers bringing in their brews to sample to the large crowd of attendees over a short period of time. This Saturday at Farmers Park in Anaheim, FirkFest will do that same thing, except the participating breweries will bring only casks to this party. A unique fest of its kind, cask ales rarely get this type of exposure, largely due to the portability of it. As a result, only cask ales from west coast breweries can survive the trip here.

Aside from the drinks featured here, FirkFest operates largely like most other beer festivals. Admission to this festival costs $55, and includes unlimited beer tastings from all the participating breweries from noon to 3:45pm, plus free parking. Around this small area, other activities include live music and some recreational games, like bocce ball, beanbag toss, hula hoops, Jenga, and more. Towards the entrance, guests can purchase food from any of the available food vendors. The majority of the beers’ alcohol percentage range from six to eight percent, with a few going above or below that. As this event takes place mostly outdoors, make sure you prepare to spend all that time under the sun, so dress for warm weather, and have sunscreen applied just in case. Attendees can find plenty of free parking in the nearby neighborhoods, or can park in a structure adjacent to City Hall for free that day.