Posts Tagged ‘Arcade’

Food and dining trends change very often, especially in larger metropolitan areas. Trends and fads have their phases where they have immense popularity but then fade away slowly after its peak. For example, take a look at the gourmet food truck trend. This trend started in 2008 with the introduction of Kogi BBQ. From there, many more aspiring chefs started their own gourmet food truck as a lower-cost method of jumping into the restaurant industry. It proved a success for many of them, with a lot of the more popular food trucks eventually making the jump over to a brick & mortar restaurant once the gourmet food truck fad started to die down. After this trend faded down, gastropubs claimed the spotlight for a time. However, while gastropubs catered to a few types of people, it did not do well to attract everyone, as everyone has different tastes and want more varieties. Nothing has more variety than a food court, and thus the idea of food halls started up. Food halls represent the modern contemporary version of food courts, kind of like what gourmet food trucks did for the traditional food truck. Today, food halls do a great job of attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors to dine there daily, as these food halls provide culinary variety and a comfortable environment for visitors to relax in, such as at McFadden Public Market.

McFadden Public Market officially opened their doors to the public on Monday, May 15th, 2017. The latest food hall to join Orange County, McFadden Public Market represents the creative genius of Orange County entrepreneur Leonard Chan, the mastermind behind popular restaurants such as The Iron Press and Hatch. Unlike other food halls in Orange County, Leonard basically owns everything within McFadden Public Market. Every “business” here falls under the ownership of Leonard, while at other food halls, each business belongs to its respective owners. McFadden Public Market consists of two floors. The first floors contains all the food, plus a bar at the front. Currently, food offerings include Latin/Filipino, fried chicken, ice cream, and Vietnamese. The first floor still has a handful of openings, so one can expect more food variety here in the future, including a coffee bar. The second floor represents the fun or leisure side of McFadden Public Market. The second floor not only has a full bar, but also has an arcade, which features many pinball machines and old-school arcade games. Between the food, the drinks, the games, and the free WiFi, visitors can easily make a great afternoon or night here.

McFadden Public Market has lots of room to grow, as they will soon add more food, drinks, and games to their lineup. Stay updated with what happens here by liking them on Facebook.

Arcade Expo 3.0 returns to Banning this upcoming weekend. Taking place at their exclusive facility across from the Banning Municipal Airport, this hall of arcade machines houses hundreds of classic and modern video games for thousands of visitors of all ages to come and relive their childhood. Entertainment types vary from arcades to video game consoles to pinball machines and more. Admission grants all visitors full access to the expo hall for unlimited free play for the duration of the visit. In addition to all the free games available, visitors will find various movies, seminars, vendors, live music, tournaments, and more to keep them occupied. The building that houses the Arcade Expo has various rooms all with different types of arcades in them. The two main rooms represent the main halves of the expo: one half holds all the pinball machines, while the other half holds all the arcade games. The arcade half has hundreds of nostalgic video games, most of which resemble 8-bit games such as those found on the original Nintendo system. While most of the arcade games fall under the category of 8-bit to 16-bit, visitors can find a few modern games, such as Marvel vs. Capcom 2. Beyond the arcade room, visitors can walk outside to find the main stage, where live bands, DJ’s, and speakers set up.

Visitors can find Arcade Expo 3.0 at 700 South Hathaway St across the street from the Banning Municipal Airport. Early arrivals can park for free in the venue’s parking lot; otherwise, visitors should look for street parking nearby. The expo runs from 2:30pm to 12am on Friday, 11am to 2am on Saturday, and 11am to 7pm on Sunday. Adult general admission for Friday and Sunday costs $35. On Saturday, adult admission costs $55. Children admission costs $20 per day. A three-day pass costs $110 for adults or $55 for children. The venue has vending machines and a snack bar, plus they usually invite mobile food vendors and food trucks to keep visitors fed, so bring extra cash for food and drinks. The venue only has one set of restrooms, which almost always has a line. As such, I highly suggest eating and using the restroom prior to traveling to Arcade Expo – visitors can find food throughout Banning, or in Beaumont or Cabazon nearby. If traveling via 10 freeway eastbound, consider passing through Riverside or Redlands as they have lots of food options.

Last year, the bulk of the expo’s action took place in the pinball half of the building. This side contains hundreds of pinball machines, ranging from the traditional classic 2D machines to the modern machines with ramps and lighting effects. A pinball machines exists for virtually any theme in the world, and this expo has a pinball machine for it all. They even have some adult-themed pinball machines, one of which has actual nudity in it.

For more info direct from the source, check out Arcade Expo on Facebook and Twitter.

Thousands of adults got to relive their childhood this past weekend at Arcade Expo 2.0 that returned in Banning. This three-day expo contained hundreds of different arcade machines, games, and pinball machines that visitors of all ages could come to play to their heart’s content for the duration of their visit. In addition to all the free games available, various movies, seminars, vendors, live music, tournaments, and more kept visitors occupied.

The building that housed the Arcade Expo had various rooms all with different types of arcades in them. The two main rooms represented the main halves of the expo: one half held all the pinball machines, while the other half held all the arcade games. The arcade half had hundreds of nostalgic video games, most of which resembled 8-bit games such as those found on the original Nintendo system. While most of the arcade games fell under the category of 8-bit to 16-bit, visitors could find a few modern games, such as Marvel vs. Capcom 2. Outside the pinball hall, visitors could walk outside to find the main stage, where live bands and DJ’s set up. This outer area also housed all the food vendors, the beer garden, the shooting gallery, and a pinball exhibit.

The bulk of the expo’s action took place in the pinball half of the building. This side contained hundreds of pinball machines, ranging from the traditional classic 2D machines to the modern machines with ramps and lighting effects. A pinball machines exists for virtually any theme in the world, and this expo had a pinball machine for it all. They even had some adult-themed pinball machines, one of which had actual nudity in it.

Anyone who grew up with these sorts of traditional games would not want to miss the Arcade Expo. Adults especially would get a kick out of replaying some of these classic games that they may not have seen in decades. My eyes gleamed with delight when I discovered some classic games I grew up with, such as the Simpsons arcade game and the Surfer pinball machine. The Arcade Expo will return to Banning again next year, so make a note to look out for this in January next year. Having already attended and experienced this, I do not believe that I may return. However, I urge everyone to attend this annual event at least once in their life. Check out Arcade Expo on Facebook and Twitter for additional coverage.

Arcade Expo 2.0 returns to Banning this upcoming weekend. Taking place at their exclusive facility across from the Banning Municipal Airport, this hall of arcade machines houses hundreds of classic and modern video games for thousands of visitors of all ages to come and relive their childhood. Entertainment types vary from arcades to video game consoles to pinball machines and more. Admission grants all visitors full access to the expo hall for unlimited free play for the duration of the visit. In addition to all the free games available, visitors will find various movies, seminars, vendors, live music, tournaments, and more to keep them occupied. The building that houses the Arcade Expo has various rooms all with different types of arcades in them. The two main rooms represent the main halves of the expo: one half holds all the pinball machines, while the other half holds all the arcade games. The arcade half has hundreds of nostalgic video games, most of which resemble 8-bit games such as those found on the original Nintendo system. While most of the arcade games fall under the category of 8-bit to 16-bit, visitors can find a few modern games, such as Marvel vs. Capcom 2. Beyond the arcade room, visitors can walk outside to find the main stage, where live bands, DJ’s, and speakers set up.

Visitors can find Arcade Expo 2.0 at 700 South Hathaway St across the street from the Banning Municipal Airport. Early arrivals can park for free in the venue’s parking lot; otherwise, visitors should look for street parking nearby. The expo runs from 2pm to 12am on Friday, 10am to 2am on Saturday, and 10am to 8pm on Sunday. General admission for Friday and Sunday costs $35 for adults or $12.50 for children. On Saturday, adult admission costs $55 while children admission costs $17.50. A three-day pass costs $100 for adults and $35 for children. The venue has vending machines and a snack bar, plus they usually invite mobile food vendors and food trucks to keep visitors fed, so bring extra cash for food and drinks. The venue only has one set of restrooms, which almost always has a line. As such, I highly suggest eating and using the restroom prior to traveling to Arcade Expo – visitors can find food throughout Banning, or in Beaumont or Cabazon nearby. If traveling via 10 freeway eastbound, consider passing through Riverside or Redlands as they have lots of food options. For more info direct from the source, check out Arcade Expo on Facebook and Twitter.

Last year, the bulk of the expo’s action took place in the pinball half of the building. This side contains hundreds of pinball machines, ranging from the traditional classic 2D machines to the modern machines with ramps and lighting effects. A pinball machines exists for virtually any theme in the world, and this expo has a pinball machine for it all. They even have some adult-themed pinball machines, one of which has actual nudity in it.

What defines modern contemporary? What generation does that term represent? Who drives the current trends and fads of the world? When looking at the demographics of the movers and shakers, we typically find young adults age 21 to 35. The world colloquially refers to people of this age range as millennials because they lived through the change of the millennium. Millennials have the greatest say as far as trends and popularity go in many aspects, especially food and fashion. So when the millennials want something, entrepreneurs ought to stay a step ahead of the competition by capitalizing on an emerging trend, something that Button Mash has done to seize a niche in the market that few others have, if none at all.

Having just launched their soft opening last month on October 20th, Echo Park’s Button Mash takes two separate worlds and mashes them into one. Putting a millennial’s spin on “entertainment restaurants” like Dave & Buster’s, Button Mash features retro arcade and pinball machines within a restaurant that serves Asian fusion cuisine and craft beer & wine. The games follow a retro theme, so guests will not find modern arcade games such as many of Capcom’s newer hits, but classic hits such as Contra, Pac Man, and Tapper. As for the restaurant side, Button Mash serves up Asian fusion food, such as Vietnamese or Korean influenced sandwiches, noodle bowls, and marinated wings. For further updates from Button Mash, like Button Mash on Facebook to see what they have in store.

I visited Button Mash on their first open weekend, and unfortunately, they had sold out of many of the foods I wanted to try. I only got to order their wings and the last order of mac & cheese. Neither dish truly impressed me – you can find better wings and mac & cheese elsewhere if you care that much about food quality. Hopefully Button Mash can stock more food in the future as to not run out of food by 8pm. Otherwise, I do not foresee myself returning any time soon to this hipster hangout.

Before getting into the content of this post, let me tell you about two great websites that any craft beer enthusiast must know about. These websites basically resemble Google Maps with breweries already pinpointed on them. Any craft beer enthusiast planning a trip of any kind, whether by ground or air, will certainly want to keep these websites bookmarked. First off, we have The Beer Mapping Project. I discovered this site a handful of years ago, which allows you to view a map and filter it by breweries, brewpubs, beer bars, beer stores, and homebrew shops. I had used this site for all that time to locate and discover new breweries until I recently discovered BreweryMap last month. BreweryMap does more or less the same thing as Beer Mapping, but BreweryMap also has smartphone apps for Apple and Android devices, allowing you to locate beer out on the field. These apps cost $2.99 last I checked, but I highly suggest buying it for the love of craft beer.

So why did I bring all that up? If you check out the regional map for the greater Los Angeles area, you will notice some huge blank spots with virtually no beer presence. Microbreweries tend to exist in geographical clusters, such as in the South Bay or in the San Gabriel Valley. Some other places have almost no beer around – when looking at a map of Los Angeles, if you draw a region going clockwise from Downtown LA consisting of the 5, 55, 405, and 10 freeways, barely any craft beer exists there, sans some brewpubs that do not distribute their brews. That particular region typically does not prefer craft beer, as Budweiser keenly pointed out with a $9 million ad. Southern California provides a great atmosphere for the growth of craft beer, and more & more people start to desire it year after year. Introducing craft beer to regions without a strong presence of it poses no easy task, but Out Of The Park Pizza dared to step up to the plate to break that barrier.

Taking over the old Season Ticket Family Pizza location tucked away in a corner at Ball Road and Valley View Street, Out Of The Park Pizza has moved in to show the local community that they have the ability to turn this spot into a successful business. This particular location has changed ownerships so much in the past decade or two, but Out Of The Park Pizza boldly stepped up to the challenge of turning this into a lasting business. Out Of The Park Pizza had already cemented their legacy as a craft beer mecca with their original location in Anaheim Hills, so they already have the following to bring big business to this new location in Buena Park. This Buena Park location has the same setup as the former business – large dining room, televisions everywhere, an arcade room for the little ones, and a smaller space towards the back for private parties. I did not count how many taps they have, but they clearly have over 20 of them, which I believe they will rotate like any decent craft beer bar does once a keg blows.

As far as the food goes, it appeals to the masses. The food has nothing on hip, trendy restaurants serving food at gastropub levels, but it works for the atmosphere and audience. As a family-friendly restaurant, the menu must appeal to all ages, so even children must like the food. They have foods like Pizza Poppers, mozzarella and pepperoni stuffed into dough balls, that anyone can enjoy, then they have lots of pizza varieties, such as the Fried Egg Monster, a pizza with beef, chicken, pepperoni, bacon, garlic, and a fried egg. The food at Out Of The Park Pizza may not win any awards from me, but it does the job of satisfying people’s hunger, and anything on their menu sounds fantastic after you have had a few brews to guzzle.

Out Of The Park Pizza’s Buena Park location had a soft opening last week, meaning they should officially open up fully within the next month or two. Follow up with them on Facebook for the latest updates, including when they plan to hold their grand opening. Folks living in the Buena Park/La Palma/Cypress area finally have a place to enjoy craft beer, and should definitely invite their friends and family here.

Thousands of adults got to relive their childhood this past weekend at the annual Arcade Expo that returned in Banning. This three-day expo contained hundreds of different arcade machines, games, and pinball machines that visitors of all ages could come to play to their heart’s content for the duration of their visit. In addition to all the free games available, various movies, seminars, vendors, live music, tournaments, and more kept visitors occupied.

The building that housed the Arcade Expo had various rooms all with different types of arcades in them. The two main rooms represented the main halves of the expo: one half held all the pinball machines, while the other half held all the arcade games. The arcade half had hundreds of nostalgic video games, most of which resembled 8-bit games such as those found on the original Nintendo system. While most of the arcade games fell under the category of 8-bit to 16-bit, visitors could find a few modern games, such as Marvel vs. Capcom 2. Beyond the arcade room, visitors could walk outside to find the main stage, where live bands, DJ’s, and speakers set up.

The bulk of the expo’s action took place in the pinball half of the building. This side contained hundreds of pinball machines, ranging from the traditional classic 2D machines to the modern machines with ramps and lighting effects. A pinball machines exists for virtually any theme in the world, and this expo had a pinball machine for it all. They even had some adult-themed pinball machines, one of which had actual nudity in it.

Anyone who grew up with these sorts of traditional games would not want to miss the Arcade Expo. Adults especially would get a kick out of replaying some of these classic games that they may not have seen in decades. My eyes gleamed with delight when I discovered some classic games I grew up with, such as the Simpsons arcade game and the Surfer pinball machine. The Arcade Expo will return to Banning again next year, so make a note to look out for this in January next year. Having already attended and experienced this, I do not believe that I may return. However, I urge everyone to attend this annual event at least once in their life.