Good raw street punk music lives on as the Smut Peddlers and Angry Samoans co-headlined a punk rock show at Los Globos in Silverlake west of Los Angeles this past Saturday night. Summertime marks a great time to check out live music shows, and this past Saturday held nothing back when it came to music shows, especially in Southern California. With other great shows going on, such as Guttermouth, one would definitely have a difficult time selecting a show to attend. With a lineup consisting of nine bands, this show at Los Globos would definitely give you your money’s worth.

Killroy mysteriously did not show up to perform on this night. Instead, Testicle Difficulties substituted in for Killroy. I originally would have seen these guys at Slam Dance Fest; however, they failed to bring I.D. for that 18+ show. Fitting in quite well with the slam dance and street punk crowd, Testicle Difficulties started off the night on the upstairs stage with their loud, ferocious set, easily attracting the attentions of everyone just entering. They brought a decent following, as they received many cheers from the crowd. Many attendees did not know what occurred to Killroy, but with Testicle Difficulties’ performance, we received just as much entertainment.

The first of the night’s two female-fronted bands, Drop Tank, opened up the downstairs stage. As a slight anomaly for the night, Drop Tank’s sound did not resemble the hard street punk that all the other bands played. Without any way to actually classify Drop Tank’s music, they played just straight up rock music with a punk twist. Imagine a cross between Slunt and Fiction Reform, and you get Drop Tank. Regardless of what they sound like, Drop Tank still did a great job entertaining the crowd and keeping them pumped up for all the music to come. Expect to see a lot of Drop Tank in the near future, as they have picked up quite a bit of momentum recently in playing shows.

Trekking back upstairs sees the return of another band I last saw at Slam Dance Fest, Hari Kari. At Slam Dance Fest, Hari Kari played a handful of cover songs. This time, they deviated far from that by playing their original hardcore punk music from the 1980’s. Vocalist Alma had not even entered the stage for their first song and a pit already got going. Bringing back the original songs shows how serious this show means to Hari Kari as well as the crowd, who explicitly reciprocated the love back to the band throughout their set. If Hari Kari keeps this up, they may headline a show very soon.

Coming back downstairs sees the return of Destruction Made Simple to the stage. Following a series of unfortunate events to some of their members, they have bit the bullet by jumping on stage to deliver this knockout of a show. With an album set to release any week now, Destruction Made Simple could not contain their excitement, and expelled all of their pent up energy out on the stage. Playing a mix of old and new songs, Destruction Made Simple ensured that a sizable pit would get going by the time vocalist Raul could even start rocking out. They all rocked out as hard as their bodies would allow them – guitarist Andy had just recovered from a broken ankle, while bassist Edgar’s ankle got ran over by a truck last week. Despite a few injuries, no one would ever suspect a thing, as the crowd fell into the motions of the music… sweet street punk music.

The night of stars continued with Evacuate playing next upstairs. True punk fans will recognize vocalist Mike Virus from The Virus and Cheap Sex, both incredibly intense hardcore bands from back in the day. He keeps up that intensity with Evacuate, still playing hardcore punk as we all know it. They played a set nearly identical to the set they played at Slam Dance Fest, only making a few song swaps and order changes. The release of a compilation album that Mike Virus helped create, Punk Aid, helped to fuel the boundless energy emanating from the stage. This energy would carry on for the remaining bands for the rest of the night.

The night gets more old-school with the return of False Confession playing downstairs. As one of the founding bands of the Nardcore movement, False Confession has a left a significant impact on the punk rock industry as we know it. Hardcore punk would not sound the same without Nardcore, so we thank the founding bands for their involvement in the shape of hardcore punk today. False Confession still has what they had 30 years ago – raw energy that translates well into the skate punk scene. As high profile as the bands come, the crowd knew they had to save up energy for the rest of the night.

The old school theme would resonate the rest of the night, as Circle One took to the upstairs stage. As another early 1980’s hardcore punk band, Circle One attracted a huge following to this show, as most of the crowd consisted of adults in their 30’s or higher at this point. Suffice to say, Circle One paved the foundation of hardcore punk when they started over 30 years ago, which gave way to today’s mainstream bands that claim to have started off during that era. Unfortunately those mainstream bands deviated so far from hardcore punk that they now play metal music, while the general public, ignorant to true hardcore punk, would refer to metal music as hardcore punk, which could not fall further from the truth. However, I digress – Circle One delivered a killer show that catered to everyone. In some ways, their music remind me of Institutionalized by Suicidal Tendencies with the way they speak during some songs. Not once did the energy falter, keeping the crowd amped up and craving more. The crowd would receive more, as the night had a few more bands to go.

Reaching the first of two headliners, we now approach Angry Samoans downstairs in the lounge. Words cannot accurately describe an Angry Samoans show – you honestly have to experience one for yourself. With 45 minutes to play, they tried to stock as many songs as they could into their allotted time, as evident by their set list. They switched it up at times too, allowing the drummer time on the mic and swapping with their vocalist. At multiple points during their set, a gal from the crowd would run up to the stage to pull up her top and show off her goodies to the crowd, much to the chagrin of the Angry Samoans. I spotted her doing so three times – she must have done it multiple times in the pit, as did a few other gals, as I later discovered. Once the set had ended, everyone bolted upstairs for the final act of the night.

At long last, the night’s headliner had arrived. The Smut Peddlers finalized stage preparations to an ovation that filled the entire floor. I barely could scrape by to secure a close spot, and eventually ended up nestled on a corner of the stage. So many people had crowded up here that the pit felt more like that of a massive concert, where the entire crowd moves but no actual moshing occurs. The Smut Peddlers had a great time playing their hits and interacting with the crowd. As we all know, bands that interact with the crowds score brownie points. Does a headlining band need to score brownie points? Not necessarily, but it helps to pump up the crowd and leave them asking for more, to which the Smut Peddlers happily obliged.

Missed out on this show? Most of these bands will play another show very soon! Like all of their pages on Facebook to find out where they play next. Get out there and explore new music – not only do you broaden your scope, but you also support local music by doing so.

Advertisements
Comments
  1. maxwell says:

    The organizers of this show were Gitbam. We were no way affiliated with Slam Dance Fest.

  2. no pictures show the crowd..

  3. […] punk band still has the vision after all these years. Coincidentally, I last saw Circle One at this exact stage a few months ago – I guess you could say I have gone full […]

  4. […] a slow setup, the Angry Samoans finally started their set to close the night. Playing the exact same set that they play at all of their shows, the Angry Samoans did not pull off any tricks or anything […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s